Archive | July, 2013

The question of packaging

22 Jul

I have recently been making a few cravats and pocket squares and the thought came “well how do I display them?” Sometimes the packaging can be as important as the product as it is often the first thing people see. 

I got to thinking and ruled out bags because I felt a cravat needed something a little nicer to show off that it is an item that deserves something sturdy, a box. The box would need to be strong enough to stop it the cravat becoming creased in storage and to arrive in one piece when out for delivery. 

So what sort of box? It didn’t take me long for this part as I knew I wanted it to be a brown cardboard box and after a bit of googling I found a few websites that sold them and more importantly offered a free sample. 

A few emails later and then began the waiting for my samples. 

The first arrived and I drew up what I thought I wanted and was pretty happy. Image

But then my second box arrived and I was in love with it. It was a better shape and size and I could see a different design come into my mind. I wanted to head away from the cartoon side and do something a bit older, sketchier. It would still be playing on the idea of a Cravaten but without being so obvious with it. Hence the idea of a squid and a pocket watch. The link is tenuous at best but I think it makes the box look classy and if I received something gifted in a box like this I would be one happy girl. Image

It takes a bit of time and a fair few pages of my sketch book were used up on ideas and layout but now all my cravats are not only lovingly handmade, they come with an individually unique handdrawn box design with the option to have your own decoration drawn up to personalise it further for a tiny extra price.

There will also be some new cravats added after a shopping trip saw me purchase more fabric! 

https://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/156781476/mens-handmade-green-and-purple-paisley?

Cravat him!

14 Jul

There is something to be said about a man in a fine suit and a well dressed neck.

 
A cravat goes a long way to making a statement. And that statement is that this is being worn by one fine man. It has been scientifically proven that men with a good level of stubble growth are more sexually attractive and I don’t argue with science, but do you know what? That experiment did not take into consideration whether that man was dressed in a smashing suit and tie combo! So dress your neck to look your best and if the gentleman in question also has an outstanding moustache, then all the better I took all of this onboard and with the upcoming wedding of my sister-in-law, I thought I would make my husband a nice cravat to match the bridesmaid dress I have to wear.
 
After some shopping around I found a lovely green and purple paisley print and knew I had to make it and so I did! Below is the item in action hanging from a tree, I have to wait to buy a cravat pin before getting it being worn on camera.
 
I had to buy a fair bit of material as it was the end of the line so have decided to share this lovely fabric and am selling a few handmade high quality cravats and matching pocket squares.
 
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Summer planters

14 Jul

My husband said to me one day that he would like a rustic wooden planter and I thought “how hard can that be?” A quick shop around B&Q and I found the wood and nails I needed with a nice pot of Cornflower Blue outdoors paint. 

The tutorial for doing it is only being explained here as I only have the two end pieces photographed as I thought too late to take more. 

1. Measure and cut wood to know how many planks you need – 4 per side then how high you would like it.

2. Place planks on your designated leg wood and cut out, either leaving space for feet or flat on the floor

3. Cut legs to size.

4. Nail in wood to legs – a handy tip is that if you find the wood harder to nail when doing a different side, it helps to rest the leg on a side edge to stop it moving and when connecting the final piece, having a big bit of wood inside to hammer against. Always be careful with hammers as you can and may hit your finger!

5. Size up the bottom and nail in the base 

6. PAINT! You can go more down to earth like the cornflower blue or…brighten up your garden with a fantastic pink!!!

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After having more of a practice with these, I am hoping to hit a craft fair for the first time ever with a few of them